Wednesday, 17 July 2013

F Scott Fitzgerald | The Great Gatsby




Contrary to popular opinion, I thought this was a terrible book. The fully character-driven plot would have no mercy for the book if the reader did not favour the characters and eventually I put the book down for a good two weeks, causing me to miss out a 'crucial' chapter. Frankly, at the time, said chapter was long and daunting with no asterisk breaks and I thought to myself, "I spend a short amount of time living and able to read and there are many books out there I want to read. So why I am forcing myself to finish this book that I despise when I could be moving on to something I'll love?". So hopefully you'll understand my predicament. (The beautiful, grown-up writing in my current book has made me awfully posh;))

Firstly, Daisy. I feel indifferent about her, leaning towards disliking. I felt she was either bland or fickle and slightly dim. Her husband, Tom, I can't remember anything about as he really didn't stand out for me and personally that speaks volumes. Jay Gatsby was pretty much the only character I felt any interest in, albeit mild. I felt sorry for him in his big, lonely house that he was constantly trying for fill with his parties, and I at least felt some depth in his gloominess from his losing Daisy all those years back. The roles of any other characters confused me to the point where I simply gave up trying.

I was initially excited for this book as America in the 1920s was a history topic I'd recently covered, and I thought I would enjoy actually knowing a bit about the background at the time. (This is the perfect example of why I've chosen History as one of my GCSEs.) But alas, I'd forgotten that to like a book, you have to like the book and not just the setting.

I'm sorry this wasn't a glowing review, but here are my cat's thoughts on the matter:
-*9o,[-]]]--------------------------------------]
(She also dribbled on the keyboard and began to reprogram the page somehow)

Anyway, these are just my opinions and I'm not preaching them as the truth. I might bring myself to reread it when I'm older to see if I can conform and 'appreciate' it a bit more. 1/5 stars. (Sorry Mr Fitzgerald. I like your name though.)

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